Jelly Doughnut Ice Cream

15 Dec

“Put on your yalmulka, here comes Hanukkah 
Its so much fun-akkah to celebrate Hanukkah, 

Hanukkah is the festival of lights, 
Instead of one day of presents, we have eight crazy nights. ” ~ Adam Sandler

Jelly Doughnut Ice Cream

Let me be clear about one thing before I go any further. I almost feel like this is confessional: I have never fried anything, and so I had absolutely no idea what to expect. This is coming from a girl who, though she loves herself a good dessert, was never, ever allowed to eat anything fried. In fact, the only way we were ever able to convince my mom to let us eat a doughnut was to tell her that it was a cinnamon bun (nevermind that it was deep fried and glazed!). Talk about pulling a fast one on her. Scarfing down those “cinnamon buns” was a blast. It felt so good. So rebellious. So child-like.

Enter the sufganiya. Many of my ice cream recipes pay homage to my childhood days, but this one, ah this golden, cinnamon sugar coated bundle of goodness, reminds me so much of Chanukkah that I get giddy like a little school girl just thinking about it. Maybe if I tap my heels together three times some presents will show up at my door! Wishful thinking.

Back to these sufganiyot. The Hebrew word for sufganiya derived from the word for sponge (sfog), is supposed to describe the texture of a sufganiya which is somewhat similar to a sponge. I like to tell myself that because the texture is like a sponge (which I think is airy, not fried and fatty!) a sufganiya is completely healthy. And when injected with raspberry preserves, even healthier!

Look what I made -- the jelly doughnut itself!

During Chanukkah in Israel, one famous bakery alone purportedly makes 250,000 sufganiyot. I made 20 and it took me a half day. To make 250,000 I’d have to make 12,500 batches, which would take me 6,250 days or 17 years. No thanks!

This time of year, when all I do is eat sweets, I try to refrain from thinking about how unhealthy it is and instead think about the significance of these doughnuts. On Chanukkah we eat these golden delicious sufganiyot because they are fried in oil, which helps to remind us of one of the miracles of Chanukkah. When the Maccabees were fighting the Greeks, they only found enough oil to light the Temple Menorah for one night. But, in a twist of fate, the oil lasted for eight nights, the exact length of Chanukkah.  In fact, the name “Chanukkah” derives from the Hebrew verb meaning “to dedicate”. On Chanukkah, the Jews regained control of Jerusalem and rededicated the Temple.

So, to toast that small miracle, let’s chow down on some delicious Sufganiyot Ice Cream. Enjoy!

Sufganiyot Ice Cream

Idea created by 365scoops

Doughnuts adapted from Martha Stewart and Vanilla Ice Cream adapted from David Lebovitz

Ingredients

 

Make a well in the flour and add in the wet ingredients

For the Sufganiyot

2 tablespoons active dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water (100 degrees to 110 degrees)
1/4 cup plus 1 teaspoon sugar, plus more for rolling
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
2 large eggs
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
2 teaspoons salt
3 cups vegetable oil, plus more for bowl
1 cup seedless raspberry jam

Additional cinnamon and sugar for dusting

 

 

Rolling out the doughnut dough

For the Vanilla Bean Ice Cream

1 cup whole milk

2 cups half-and-half

3/4 cup sugar

3 egg yolks

1 tbs vanilla bean paste

3/4 tsp vanilla extract

 

Cutting the doughnut rounds

For the Raspberry Sauce

1- 12oz bag of frozen raspberries

1 tbs raspberry vodka

3 tbs sugar

Method

For this recipe, patience is a must! This is a multi-step process but trust me, it’s worth it. (Note: this recipe can be made over 2 days if you don’t have an entire Sunday afternoon as I did!)

First, make the vanilla ice cream base. In a small saucepan heat together the milk, 1 cup half-and-half, sugar and the vanilla bean paste until small bubbles form around the edges.

Frying up the first batch (before flipping)

While the mixture is warming, whisk together three egg yolks. Pour the milk mixture into the egg yolks very slowly, stirring between each pour. Scrape the bottom of the bowl to make sure you get all the vanilla bean paste, and pour back into the saucepan. Heat until the mixture reaches 170 degrees F. If you don’t have a thermometer heat until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spatula or a wooden spoon.

Golden brown doughnuts, immediately before removing from the hot oil

Once ready, pour over a fine mesh strainer into a clean bowl (it’s important to strain this ice cream because inevitably small little curdles will form from heating the egg and milk, and trust me, you don’t want those in your ice cream!). Once strained, slowly stir in the remaining cup of half-and-half and the vanilla extract.

Let the mixture cool completely before refrigerating for at least 2 hours or overnight.

Just after being rolled in cinnamon sugar and filled with raspberry jam, these doughnuts are ready to be chopped and swirled into ice cream

Next, it’s time to make the sufganiyot! This, my friends, is a labor of love. In a small bowl, combine yeast, warm water, and 1 teaspoon sugar. Set aside until foamy, about 10 minutes.

Place flour in a large bowl. Make a well in the center; add eggs, yeast mixture, 1/4 cup sugar, butter, and salt. Using a wooden spoon, stir until a sticky dough forms. On a well-floured work surface, knead until dough is smooth, soft, and bounces back when poked with a finger, about 8 minutes (add more flour if necessary). Place in an oiled bowl; cover with plastic wrap. Set in a warm place to rise until doubled, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

While the ice cream mixture is cooling, and the sufganiyot are rising, make the raspberry sauce. Pour the bag of frozen raspberries into a small saucepan, and mix until heated.

Making the raspberry sauce

The raspberries will turn to mush (which is what you want). Stir in the sugar and vodka and let the mixture heat for 2-4 minutes. Remove from the heat, and strain through a fine mesh strainer. Discard the seeds, and keep the smooth raspberry sauce. Set aside.

Next, it’s time to form and fry the donuts. On a lightly floured work surface, roll dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Using a 2 1/2-inch-round cutter or drinking glass , cut 20 rounds. Cover with plastic wrap; let rise 15 minutes.

Adding vanilla to the ice cream base

In medium saucepan over medium heat, heat oil until a deep-frying thermometer registers 370 degrees. Using a slotted spoon, carefully slip 4 rounds into oil. Fry until golden, about 10-20 seconds on each side. Turn doughnuts over; fry until golden on other side, another 10-20 seconds. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a paper-towel-lined baking sheet. Roll in cinnamon sugar while warm. Fry all dough, and roll in the cinnamon sugar mixture.

Chopped up doughnuts right before they go into the ice cream maker!

This part of the process takes a little getting used to. Inevitably your first few doughnuts will burn. Don’t stress, you will have plenty more. I noticed that by the time I put 3-4 doughnuts into the hot oil, it was time to flip them, and once they were flipped, it was time to remove them! Hard to keep up with it! If the doughnuts look burnt, chances are, they’re totally fine, just slightly darker than you may have wanted. Don’t worry, they still taste delicious! Also, it’s very important to douse the doughnuts in the cinnamon sugar immediately after frying, otherwise it won’t stick.

The layered ice cream, right out of the ice cream maker

Once you’re done frying all the doughnuts you’ll want to fill them with jam. Since I didn’t have a pastry bag or a #4 tip I used a ziploc bag with a tiny whole cut out. I wouldn’t recommend this, so if you can, head over to Michael’s Craft Shop or a baking store and buy a pastry bag and a #4 tip. It’s much easier!

Fill a pastry bag fitted with a #4 tip with jam. Using a wooden skewer or toothpick, make a hole in the side of each doughnut. Fit the pastry tip into a hole, pipe about 2 teaspoons jam into doughnut. Repeat with remaining doughnuts.

Almost done…

Take a bite of that!

Now it’s time for the great assembly! Pour the ice cream mixture into the base of your ice cream maker and churn according to the manufacturer’s instructions. While churning, chop up 6 doughnuts into small pieces. Approximately 5 minutes before the mixture is done churning add the sufganiyot pieces and let it mix thoroughly.

Drizzle a few tablespoons of raspberry sauce on the bottom of a freezer safe container. Add a few scoops of ice cream. Cover with more raspberry sauce and repeat process until you’ve layered the ice cream and raspberry sauce. Drizzle a bit more raspberry sauce on top and cover. Transfer to the freezer for at least 2 hours before serving. You will have leftover raspberry sauce, which I advise saving for garnish!

Jelly doughnut ice cream, with a side of jelly doughnut. Yum.

When you’re ready to eat, scoop 1-2 heaps of ice cream into a bowl (you’ll notice there is a beautiful raspberry marble!) and drizzle with raspberry sauce on top. Enjoy!

The Verdict: Taim me’od! (very tasty!) This is a perfect treat for the holiday season. In fact, so tasty that I recommend sharing it with friends (like I did) or else you may gobble the whole thing up! Enjoy this fun take on an old classic and Happy Chanukkah!

 


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One Response to “Jelly Doughnut Ice Cream”

  1. Laura Weiss November 17, 2012 at 8:42 pm #

    Love your blog. I’m the author of Ice Cream: A Global History. I’d love to talk to you about doing a holiday giveaway of my book, which is filled with fun facts about ice cream.

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